Key House Committee Votes To Advance HSA & Other Health Choice Reforms; Plans 7/17 Health Care Fraud Hearings

July 13, 2018

A flurry of activity in the House Ways & Means Committee and other Congressional committees over the past few weeks signals the advisability of keeping a close eye on health care and health benefit reform proposals this Summer in anticipation of both the Fall health benefit enrollment and renewal season and the mid-term November Congressional elections.

Certainly continued Congressional commitment to pursue reform is evident from the House Ways & Means Committee’s health care heavy agenda of hearings and votes that this week alone resulted in its voting in favor of 11 health care reform bills promising new flexibility for employers about how to design their health plans and American families more health care choices and choice about how to pay for it and what coverage to buy popular with many providers, patients and employer and other health plan sponsors. While it remains to be seen if the House and Senate can agree on any or all of these proposal, the bi-partisan sponsorship of many of these proposals and the intensity of the focus of the Committee and others in Congress reflects a strong interest in health care reform by both parties leading up to November that could impact health benefit and other health care choices for providers, employers and American families in the Fall annual enrollment season.

The legislation passed by the Ways & Means Committee this weeks include bills that would:

  • Provide relief for employers relief from the Obamacare’s employer mandate and delay for an additional year the effective date of the widely disliked “Cadillac Tax;”
  • Overrule the “Use it Or Lose It” requirement in current Internal Revenue Regulations for healthcare flexible spending arrangement plans (HFSAs) that currently forces employers sponsoring HFSAs to draft their plans to require employees to forfeit unused salary reduction contributions in their HFSA accounts at the end of the year;
  • Offer individuals and families eligible for Obamacare created health premium subsidies more choice about where to obtain that coverage using their subsidies; and
  • Expand expand the availability and usability of HSAs in a multitude of ways.

While the recurrent stalling of past reform efforts over the past few years calls into question whether any or all of these proposals can make it through the highly politicized and divided Congress, bi-partisian sponsorship of most of the bills reported out this week at least raises the possibility that some of these proposals enjoy sufficient bi-partisan support to potentially pass before the elections. With both parties viewing health care reform as a key issue in the upcoming elections, voter feedback on these proposals could play a big role in determining the prospects for passage this Summer.

Passage of any or all of these proposed reforms between now and year end likely will fuel the need for last minute reconsideration and potential adjustments in plan design choices of employers and other health plan sponsors and administrators, reconsideration of health benefit enrollment choices of individual Americans and their families and a reconsideration of practice billing and health plan participation decisions of physicians and other health care providers. Accordingly, health care providers, employers and other health plan sponsors, American taxpayers and their families and others impacted by health care and health benefit policies will want to carefully monitor these reforms as the Summer progresses:

  • To provide timely input to Congress on proposed reforms of particular benefit or concern;
  • To help plan for and deal with rules changes that could impact their options and choices during the upcoming health plan renewal and enrollment season this Fall and going forward; and
  • To be prepared to make informed choices when voting in the upcoming mid-term Congressional elections in November.

To learn more details about this proposed legislation, its potential implications or other related concerns, see here or contact the author.

About the Author

After holding hearings on health savings account reforms and passing a flurry of health care reform bills intended to give employers relief from two key Obamacare mandates, to allow Obamacare subsidy-eligible Americans the choice to use the subsidies to purchase health care coverage not offered by the Obamacare exchanges,  and a host of bills that would expand availability and usability of health savings account (HSA) and health care flexible spending account (HFSA) programs this week, the House Ways and Means Committee will turn its attention to health care fraud oversight and reform next week by holding hearings Tuesday on those health concerns.  Health care providers, employer and other health plan sponsors, individual Americans and their families, and others interested in health benefit and health care reform will want to keep a close eye on these and other developments as Congress continues to debate health care reform in the runup to the upcoming 2018 health benefit plan renewal and annual enrollment season and November’s mid-term elections.

Committee Approved 11 Health Care Reform Bills This Week

As a part of its health reform efforts this week, the Committee voted to advance 11 health care reform bills offering new flexibility for employers about how to design their health plans and American families more health care choices and choice about how to pay for it and what coverage to buy popular with many providers, patients and employer and other health plan sponsors.

Among the approved legislation is a bill that would provide key relief for employers from certain key Obamacare mandates that have been widely unpopular with employers.  H.R. 4616, the “Employer Relief Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) and Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA), which would give employers sponsoring health plans for their employees retroactive relief from Obamacare’s onerous employer mandate and delay for an additional year the effective date of another Obamacare requirement that when effective, will forces employers to pay the 40 percent tax on amounts paid for employer sponsored health care coverage  that exceeds cost limits specified in the Obamacare legislation commonly known as the “Cadillac Tax.”  Relief from the Cadillac Tax is widely perceived as benefiting bother employers and their employees, as its provisions penalize employers for spending more for employee health coverage than limits specified in the Obamacare law.  These provisions also are particularly viewed by many as unfair because rising health plan costs since Obamacare’s passage make it likely that many employers will incur the tax penalty simply by sponsoring relatively basic health plans meeting the Obamacare mandates.

In addition to H.R. 4616,  the Committee also voted to approve H.R. 6313, the “Responsible Additions and Increases to Sustain Employee Health Benefits Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH), which would overrule the “Use it Or Lose It” requirement in current Internal Revenue Regulations for HFSAs.  Currently, this rule forces employers sponsoring HFSAs to draft their plans to require employees to forfeit unused salary reduction contributions in their HFSA accounts at the end of the year.  The bill would allow employers to eliminate this forfeiture requirement so that employees could carry over any remaining unused balances in their HFSAs at the end of the year to use in a later  year.

The Committee also voted to advance legislation to offer individuals and families eligible for Obamacare created health premium subsidies more choice about where to obtain that coverage.  H.R. 6311, the “Increasing Access to Lower Premium Plans Act of 2018,” sponsored by Chairman Peter Roskam (R-IL) and Rep. Michael C. Burgess, M.D. (R-TX), would provide individuals receiving subsidies to help purchase health care coverage through the Obamacare-created health insurance exchange the option to use their premium tax credit to purchase health care coverage from qualified plans offered outside of the exchanges.  Currently, subsidies may only be used to purchase coverage from health plans offered through the exchange, which often are much more costly and offer substantially fewer coverage options and less provider choice.  In addition, the bill would expand access to the lowest-premium plans available for all individuals purchasing coverage in the individual market and allows the premium tax credit to be used to offset the cost of such plans.

Along with these reforms, the Committee also voted to pass a host of bills that would expand the availability and usability of HSAs including:

  • H.R. 6301, the “Promoting High-Value Health Care Through Flexibility for High Deductible Health Plans Act of 2018,” co-sponsored by Health Subcommittee Chairman Peter Roskam (R-IL) and Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA), which seeks to expand access and enhance  the utility of Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) by offering patients greater flexibility in designing their plan design while still being able to maintain their eligibility for HSA contributions.
  • H.R. 6305, the “Bipartisan HSA Improvement Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA) and Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), which also would expand HSA access and  utility by allowing spouses to also make contributions to HSAs is their spouse has an FSA and lets employers offer certain services to employees through on-site or retail clinics.
  • H.R. 6317, the “Primary Care Enhancement Act of 2018,” co-sponsored by Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN) and Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), which seeks to protect HSA-eligible individuals who participate in a direct primary care (DPC) arrangement from losing their HSA-eligibility merely because of their participation in a DPC. In addition, it allows DPC provider fees to be covered with HSAs.
  • H.R. 6312, the “Personal Health Investment Today (PHIT) Act,” sponsored by Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO) and Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI), which seeks to fight obesity and promote wellness by allowing taxpayers to use tax-preferred accounts to pay costs of gym membership or exercise classes, children’s school sports programs and certain other wellness programs and activities.
  • H.R. 6309, the “Allowing Working Seniors to Keep Their Health Savings Accounts Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN), which would expand HSA eligibility to include Medicare eligible seniors who are still in the workforce.
  • H.R.6199, the “Restoring Access to Medication Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-KS) and Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY), which would reverse Obamacare’s prohibition on using tax-favored health accounts to purchase over-the-counter medical products and would add feminine products to the list of qualified medical expenses for the purposes of these tax-favored health accounts.
  • H.R. 6306, the “Improve the Rules with Respect to Health Savings Accounts,” sponsored by Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN), which would increase the contribution limits for HSAs and further enhances flexibility in plans by allowing both spouses to contribute to make catch-up contributions to the same account and creating a new grace period for medical expenses incurred before the HSA was established.
  • H.R. 6314, the “Health Savings Act of 2018,” sponsored by Rep. Burgess (R-TX) and Rep. Roskam (R-IL), would expand eligibility and access to HSAs by allowing plans categorized as “catastrophic” and “bronze” in the exchanges to qualify for HSA contributions.

Committee Considers Health Care Fraud Next Week 

The Committee next week will turn its attention to health care fraud by holding two hearings on Tuesday.

Both hearings are scheduled to take place in Room 1100 Longworth and their proceedings will be live streamed on YouTube.

The Committee’s health care reform focus this week and next are reflective of the continued emphasis of members of Congress in both parties on health care reform legislation as they prepare for the impending mid-term elections in November.  As a part of these efforts,  the House and Senate already over the past several months have held a wide range of hearings in various committees and key votes on a multitude of reform proposals.  Numerous other hearings and votes are planned over the next several months as Congressional leaders from both parties work to advance their health care agendas in anticipation of the upcoming elections.

Key health care and health benefit reform  proposals that the Republican Majority has designated for priority consideration include:

  • Prescription drug costs by checking perceived negative effects of health industry and health plan consolidations involving large health insurers, pharmacy benefit  management companies (PBMs), pharmacy companies and other health industry and health insurance organizations on health care costs and patient, plan sponsor and plan sponsor choice and health care quality;
  • Oversight and reform of existing STARK, anti-kickback and other federal health care rules and exemptions relied upon by PBMs and other health industry organizations;
  • Efforts to understand and address health care treatment, health care and coverage costs and related social concerns associated with mental health and opioid and other substance abuse conditions and their treatment;
  • Efforts promote health  benefit and health care choice, affordability and coverage;  improve patient and employer choice; promote broader health care access and quality; reduce counterproductive regulation; and other health insurance and care improvements through expanded availability of health savings accounts, direct primary care and other consumer directed health care options, association health plan and other program options, streamlining quality reporting and regulation, billing and coding, physician and other health care provider electronic billing and recordkeeping,  and other provider,  payer, employer, individual and other health insurance mandates and other federal health care and health plan rules; and
  • More.

Health care providers, employers and other health plan sponsors, American taxpayers and their families and others will want to carefully monitor these reforms as the Summer progresses:

  • To provide timely input to Congress on proposed reforms of particular benefit or concern;
  • To help plan for and deal with rules changes that could impact their options and choices during the upcoming health plan renewal and enrollment season this Fall and going forward; and
  • To be prepared to make informed choices when voting in the upcoming mid-term Congressional elections in November.

About the Author

Recognized repeatedly by her peers as a Martindale-Hubble “AV-Preeminent” (Top 1%) and “Top Rated Lawyer” with special recognition LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell® as “LEGAL LEADER™ Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law and Labor and Employment Law; as among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” for her work in the fields of “Labor & Employment,” “Tax: Erisa & Employee Benefits,” “Health Care” and “Business and Commercial Law” by D Magazine, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer is a practicing attorney board certified in labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and management consultant, author, public policy advocate and lecturer widely known for 30+ years of health industry, health and other benefit, workforce and other management work, public policy leadership and advocacy, coaching, teachings, and publications.

Highly valued for her rare ability to find pragmatic client-centric solutions by combining her detailed legal and operational knowledge and experience with her talent for creative problem-solving, Ms. Stamer’s clients include employer, associations, government and other health benefit sponsors and administrators, public and private, domestic and international hospitals, health care systems, clinics, skilled nursing, long term care, rehabilitation and other health care providers and facilities; medical staff, accreditation, peer review and quality committees and organizations; billing, utilization management, management services organizations, group purchasing organizations; pharmaceutical, pharmacy, and prescription benefit management and organizations; consultants; investors; technology, billing and reimbursement and other services and product vendors; products and solutions consultants and developers; investors; managed care organizations, insurers, self-insured health plans and other payers; and other health industry, insurance, technology, government and other management clients.

A former lead consultant to the Government of Bolivia on its Pension Privatization Project with extensive domestic and international public policy concerns in pensions, healthcare, workforce, immigration, tax, education and other areas, Ms. Stamer has been extensively involved in U.S. federal, state and local health care and other legislative and regulatory reform impacting these concerns throughout her career.

Beyond her public policy and regulatory affairs involvement, Ms. Stamer also has extensive experience helping these and other clients to design and reform programs and practices; establish and administer compliance and risk management policies; comply with requirements, investigate and respond to government; accreditation and quality organizations; private litigation and other federal and state health care industry investigations and enforcement actions; evaluate and influence legislative and regulatory reforms and other regulatory and public policy advocacy; training and discipline; enforcement, and a host of other related concerns. supports these organizations and their leaders on both a real-time, “on demand” basis as well as outsourced operations or special counsel on an interim, special project, or ongoing basis with strategic planning and product and services development and innovation; workforce and operations management, crisis preparedness and response as well as to prevent, stabilize and cleanup legal and operational crises large and small that arise in the course of operations.

Past Chair of the ABA Managed Care & Insurance Interest Group and, a Fellow in the American College of Employee Benefit Counsel, the American Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation, Ms. Stamer has extensive health care reimbursement and insurance experience advising and defending health care providers, payers, and others about Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare and Medicaid Advantage, Tri-Care, self-insured group, association, individual and employer and association group and other health benefit programs and coverages including but not limited to advising public and private payers about coverage and program design and documentation, advising and defending providers, payers and systems and billing services entities about systems and process design, audits, and other processes; provider credentialing, and contracting; providers and payer billing, reimbursement, claims audits, denials and appeals, coverage coordination, reporting, direct contracting, False Claims Act, Medicare & Medicaid, ERISA, state Prompt Pay, out-of-network and other nonpar insured, and other health care claims, prepayment, post-payment and other coverage, claims denials, appeals, billing and fraud investigations and actions and other reimbursement and payment related investigation, enforcement, litigation and actions.

Heavily involved in health care and health information technology, data and related process and systems development, policy and operations innovation and a Scribe for ABA JCEB annual agency meeting with OCR for many years who has authored numerous highly-regarded works and training programs on HIPAA and other data security, privacy and use, Ms. Stamer also is widely recognized for her extensive work and leadership on leading edge health care and benefit policy and operational issues including meaningful use and EMR, billing and reimbursement, quality measurement and reimbursement, HIPAA, FACTA, PCI, trade secret, physician and other medical confidentiality and privacy, federal and state data security and data breach and other information privacy and data security rules and many other concerns.

Ms. Stamer helps health industry, health plans and insurers, health IT, life sciences and other health industry clients design, document and enforce plans, practices, policies, systems and solutions; manage regulatory, contractual and other legal and operational compliance; vendors and suppliers; Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, Medicare/Medicaid Advantage, ERISA and other private payer and other terms of participation, medical billing, reimbursement, claims administration and coordination, and other provider-payer relations, contracting, compliance and enforcement; Form 990 and other nonprofit and tax-exemption; fundraising, investors, joint venture, and other business partners; quality and other performance measurement, management, discipline and reporting; physician and other workforce recruiting, performance management, peer review and other investigations and discipline, wage and hour, payroll, gain-sharing and other pay-for performance and other compensation, training, outsourcing and other human resources and workforce matters; board, medical staff and other governance; strategic planning, process and quality improvement; meaningful use, EMR, HIPAA and other technology, data security and breach and other health IT and data; STARK, antikickback, insurance, and other fraud prevention, investigation, defense and enforcement; audits, investigations, and enforcement actions; trade secrets and other intellectual property; crisis preparedness and response; internal, government and third-party licensure, credentialing, accreditation, HCQIA and other peer review and quality reporting, audits, investigations, enforcement and defense; patient relations and care; internal controls and regulatory compliance; payer-provider, provider-provider, vendor, patient, governmental and community relations; facilities, practice, products and other sales, mergers, acquisitions and other business and commercial transactions; government procurement and contracting; grants; tax-exemption and not-for-profit; 1557 and other Civil Rights; privacy and data security; training; risk and change management; regulatory affairs and public policy; process, product and service improvement, development and innovation, and other legal and operational compliance and risk management, government and regulatory affairs and operations concerns.

Author of leading works on a multitude of health care, health plan and other health industry matters, the American Bar Association (ABA) International Section Life Sciences Committee Vice Chair, a Scribe for the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits (JCEB) Annual OCR Agency Meeting, former Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section, past ABA JCEB Council Representative and CLE and Marketing Committee Chair, past Board President of Richardson Development Center (now Warren Center) for Children Early Childhood Intervention Agency, past North Texas United Way Long Range Planning Committee Member, and past Board Member and Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, Ms. Stamer’s health industry clients include public health organizations; public and private hospitals, healthcare systems, clinics and other health care facilities; physicians, physician practices, medical staff, and other provider organizations; skilled nursing, long term care, assisted living, home health, ambulatory surgery, dialysis, telemedicine, DME, Pharma, clinics, and other health care providers; billing, management and other administrative services organizations; insured, self-insured, association and other health plans; PPOs, HMOs and other managed care organizations, insurance, claims administration, utilization management, and other health care payers; public and private peer review, quality assurance, accreditation and licensing; technology and other outsourcing; healthcare clearinghouse and other data; research; public and private social and community organizations; real estate, technology, clinical pathways, and other developers; investors, banks and financial institutions; audit, accounting, law firm; consulting; document management and recordkeeping, business associates, vendors, and service providers and other professional and other health industry organizations; academic medicine; trade associations; legislative and other law making bodies and others.

A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry concerns, Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about compliance and internal controls, workforce and medical staff performance, quality, governance, reimbursement, privacy and data security, and other risk management and operational matters. Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, technology, public policy, reimbursement and other operations and risk management concerns.

A Fellow in the American College of Employee Benefit Counsel, the American Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation, Ms. Stamer also shares her thought leadership, experience and advocacy on these and other related concerns by her service in the leadership of the Solutions Law Press, Inc. Coalition for Responsible Health Policy, its PROJECT COPE: Coalition on Patient Empowerment, and a broad range of other professional and civic organizations including North Texas Healthcare Compliance Association, a founding Board Member and past President of the Alliance for Healthcare Excellence, past Board Member and Board Compliance Committee Chair for the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas; former Board President of the early childhood development intervention agency, The Richardson Development Center for Children (now Warren Center For Children); current Vice Chair of the ABA Tort & Insurance Practice Section Employee Benefits Committee, current Vice Chair of Policy for the Life Sciences Committee of the ABA International Section, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section, a current Defined Contribution Plan Committee Co-Chair, former Group Chair and Co-Chair of the ABA RPTE Section Employee Benefits Group, past Representative and chair of various committees of ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits; a ABA Health Law Coordinating Council representative, former Coordinator and a Vice-Chair of the Gulf Coast TEGE Council TE Division, past Chair of the Dallas Bar Association Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation Committee, a former member of the Board of Directors of the Southwest Benefits Association and others.

For more information about Ms. Stamer or her health industry and other experience and involvements, see here or contact Ms. Stamer via telephone at (469) 767-8872 or via e-mail here.

About Solutions Law Press, Inc.™

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NOTICE: These statements and materials are for general informational and purposes only. They do not establish an attorney-client relationship, are not legal advice or an offer or commitment to provide legal advice, and do not serve as a substitute for legal advice. Readers are urged to engage competent legal counsel for consultation and representation in light of the specific facts and circumstances presented in their unique circumstance at any particular time. No comment or statement in this publication is to be construed as legal advise or an admission. The author reserves the right to qualify or retract any of these statements at any time. Likewise, the content is not tailored to any particular situation and does not necessarily address all relevant issues. Because the law is rapidly evolving and rapidly evolving rules makes it highly likely that subsequent developments could impact the currency and completeness of this discussion. The presenter and the program sponsor disclaim, and have no responsibility to provide any update or otherwise notify any participant of any such change, limitation, or other condition that might affect the suitability of reliance upon these materials or information otherwise conveyed in connection with this program. Readers may not rely upon, are solely responsible for, and assume the risk and all liabilities resulting from their use of this publication.

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©2018 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ For information about republication, please contact the author directly. All other rights reserved


Prepare For Changing IRS Tax-Exempt Org & Employee Plan Audit & Exam Info Request Rules

November 22, 2016

Health care organizations sponsoring tax-qualified employee benefit plans or operating as tax-exempt entities under the Internal Revenue (Code) should expect changes in the practices Internal Revenue Service (IRS) agents use to issue and enforce document requests (IDRs) in connection with an IRS audit or other investigation of their employee benefit plans’ tax status or compliance after March 1, 2017.

The IRS Tax Exempt and Government Entities Division (TEGE) just issued internal guidance (Guidance) outlining the new procedures its agents will use to gather information for employee benefit plan and exempt organization examinations including information requests made in connection with:

  • Employee Benefit Form 5500 Examination Procedures
  • Exempt Organizations Pre-Audit Procedures
  • On-Site Examinations
  • Tax Exempt Bonds Examinations
  • Indian Tribal Government Examinations and
  • Federal, State and Local Governments (FSLG) Examinations

The new Guidance follows other recent announcements of changes of IRS employee plan or exempt organization procedures such as recently announced changes in IRS employee plan correction procedures.  See, e.g., IRS Qualified Plan Correction Procedures Changing 1/1/17.

The new procedures defined in the Guidance apply more broadly and take effect April 1, 2017.  The Guidance also requires that TEGE update the following IRMs to specifically reflect the new procedures within the next two years:

  • IRM 4.71.1, Overview of Form 5500 Examination Procedures;
  • IRM 4.75.10, Exempt Organizations Pre-Audit Procedures;
  • IRM 4.75.11, On-Site Examination Guidelines;
  • IRM 4.81.5, Tax Exempt Bonds Examination Program Procedures – Conducting the Examination;
  • IRM 4.86.5, Conducting Indian Tribal Government Examinations; and
  • IRM 4.90.9, Federal, State and Local Governments (FSLG) – Procedures, Workpapers and Report Writing.

According to TEGE the new procedures set forth in the Guidance are designed to “ensure” that IRS Counsel is prepared to enforce IDRs through the issuance of a summons when necessary while also reinforcing the IRS’ commitment to the respect of taxpayer rights under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  TEGE says the updated procedures established in the Guidance will promote these goals by:

  • Providing for open and meaningful communication between the IRS and taxpayers;
  • Reducing taxpayer burdens
  • Providing for consistent treatment of taxpayers;
  • Allowing the IRS to secure more complete and timely responses to IDRs;
  • Providing consistent timelines for IRS agents to review IDR responses; and
  • Promoting timely issue resolution.

In furtherance of these goals, the new Guidance, among other things requires:

  • “Active involvement” by managers of IRS examiners’ early in the process;
  • Taxpayers to be involved in the IDR process;
  • Examiners to discuss the issue being examined and the information needed with the taxpayer prior to issuing an IDR;
  • Examiners to ensure that the IDR clearly states the issue and the relevant information they are requesting;
  • If the taxpayer does not timely provide the information requested in the IDR by the agreed upon date, including extensions, examiners to issue a delinquency notice;
  • If the taxpayer fails to respond to the delinquency notice or provides an incomplete response, for the examiner to issue a pre-summons notice to advise the taxpayer that the IRS will issue a summons unless the missing items are fully provided; and
  • For a summons to be issued if the taxpayer fails to provide a complete response to the pre-summons letter by its response due date.

While it remains to be seen exactly how well the new procedures will promote the intended goals in operation, leaders, sponsors, administrators and tax advisors to employee benefit plans and exempt organizations tagged for audits after the Guidelines will need to understand these new procedures to take advantage of all available options for mitigating exposures and liability from the audit as well as to avoid unfortunate missteps that could result in forfeiture of otherwise available tax-related rights and options or otherwise increase the tax and other associated risks and liabilities of the entities or others associated with them arising from the audit.

Along with responding to these tax-related risks, leaders and advisors of health care or other tax-exempt organizations and sponsors and sponsors, fiduciaries, and administrators of tax-qualified employee benefit plans also should keep in mind and take steps to ensure the often substantial non-tax related risks that usually arise concurrently or evolve from a TEGE or other tax-related audit or investigation of their benefit programs or tax-exempt status when preparing for or responding to a TEGE audit or investigation.  These often substantial tax and non-tax exposures typically makes it desirable if not necessary to involve experienced legal counsel in the process as soon as possible.

To help their entities or employee benefit plans respond appropriately to an audit and manage tax and non-tax related risks and responsibilities that the audit may trigger or enhance the entity, its responsible sponsoring entities, fiduciaries, officers and board members, or other responsible parties generally should seek legal advice within the scope of attorney-client privilege from legal counsel not only immediately upon receiving an IDR or other notice of an IRS audit or investigation, as well periodically before notification of an audit or investigation. Early involvement of legal counsel generally is necessary both to understand and manage both the tax and non-tax exposures associated with the audit, as well as to preserve and utilize the potential benefits of attorney-client privilege and other evidentiary privileges that could help to mitigate both the tax and non-tax related risks for the entity and other responsible parties.  Pre-audit consultation with qualified legal counsel within the scope of attorney-client privilege also can help to prevent or resolve potential tax-qualification or other compliance concerns on a coordinated, holistic basis in advance or more efficiently in the event of an audit or investigation.  Such pre-audit review and planning often can help entities and their leaders prevent or resolve problems with more flexibility and less risk for the entity and responsible leaders.

When planning for or responding to a TEGE or other audit or other investigation, tax-exemption hospitals and employee benefit plan sponsors and fiduciaries generally will want to engage qualified legal counsel to guide these activities and maximize the availability of attorney-client privileged, work product and other evidentiary privileges.  While federal tax rules afford some evidentiary privileges to certain accounting professionals when providing tax representation or advice, the protective scope of such privileges generally are more limited than attorney-client privilege and work product evidentiary privileges and typically do not apply to non-tax matters.  The narrower availability of evidentiary privileges generally makes it advisable to engage legal counsel at the beginning of the process to help maximize the availability of evidentiary privileges throughout the process.  As a result, most entities and their leaders will want to consider involvement of legal counsel to maximize privilege protections and non-tax related exposures even if the parties plan for a qualified tax professional or other consultant to play a significant role in assisting them to prepare for and respond to the audit.

About The Author

Recognized by her peers as a Martindale-Hubble “AV-Preeminent” (Top 1%) and “Top Rated Lawyer” with special recognition LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell® as “LEGAL LEADER™ Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law and Labor and Employment Law; as among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” for her work in the fields of “Labor & Employment,” “Tax: Erisa & Employee Benefits,” “Health Care” and “Business and Commercial Law” by D Magazine, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer is a practicing attorney and management consultant, author, public policy advocate and lecturer widely known for work, teachings and publications.

Ms. Stamer works with health industry and other businesses and their management, employee benefit plans, governments and other organizations deal with all aspects of human resources and workforce, internal controls and regulatory compliance, change management and other performance and operations management and compliance. She supports her clients both on a real-time, “on demand” basis and with longer term basis to deal with daily performance management and operations, emerging crises, strategic planning, process improvement and change management, investigations, defending litigation, audits, investigations or other enforcement challenges, government affairs and public policy.

A Fellow in the American College of Employee Benefit Counsel, the American Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation, Ms. Stamer also shares her thought leadership, experience and advocacy on these and other concerns by her service in the leadership of a broad range of other professional and civic organization including her involvement as the Vice Chair of the North Texas Healthcare Compliance Association; Executive Director of the Coalition on Responsible Health Policy and its PROJECT COPE: Coalition on Patient Empowerment; former Board President of the early childhood development intervention agency, The Richardson Development Center for Children; former Gulf Coast TEGE Council Exempt Organization Coordinator; a founding Board Member and past President of the Alliance for Healthcare Excellence; former board member and Vice President of the Managed Care Association; past Board Member and Board Compliance Committee Chair for the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas; a member and advisor to the National Physicians’ Council for Healthcare Policy; current Vice Chair of the ABA Tort & Insurance Practice Section Employee Benefits Committee; current Vice Chair of Policy for the Life Sciences Committee of the ABA International Section; Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section; a current Defined Contribution Plan Committee Co-Chair, former Group Chair and Co-Chair of the ABA RPTE Section Employee Benefits Group; immediate past RPTE Representative to ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits Council Representative and current RPTE Representative to the ABA Health Law Coordinating Council; past Chair of the Dallas Bar Association Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation Committee; a former member of the Board of Directors, Treasurer, Member and Continuing Education Chair of the Southwest Benefits Association and others.

Ms. Stamer also is a highly popular lecturer, symposia chair and author, who publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry, human resources, employment, employee benefits, compensation, and other regulatory and operational risk management. Examples of her many highly regarded publications on these matters include the “Texas Payday Law” Chapter of Texas Employment Law, as well as thousands of other publications, programs and workshops these and other concerns for the American Bar Association, ALI-ABA, American Health Lawyers, Society of Human Resources Professionals, the Southwest Benefits Association, the Society of Employee Benefits Administrators, the American Law Institute, Lexis-Nexis, Atlantic Information Services, The Bureau of National Affairs (BNA), InsuranceThoughtLeaders.com, Benefits Magazine, Employee Benefit News, Texas CEO Magazine, HealthLeaders, the HCCA, ISSA, HIMSS, Modern Healthcare, Managed Healthcare, Institute of Internal Auditors, Society of CPAs, Business Insurance, Employee Benefits News, World At Work, Benefits Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, the Dallas Morning News, the Dallas Business Journal, the Houston Business Journal, and many other symposia and publications. She also has served as an Editorial Advisory Board Member for human resources, employee benefit and other management focused publications of BNA, HR.com, Employee Benefit News, InsuranceThoughtLeadership.com and many other prominent publications and speaks and conducts training for a broad range of professional organizations and for clients on the Advisory Boards of InsuranceThoughtLeadership.com, HR.com, Employee Benefit News, and many other publications. For additional information about Ms. Stamer, see CynthiaStamer.com   or contact Ms. Stamer via email here  or via telephone to (469) 767-8872.

About Solutions Law Press, Inc.™

Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ provides human resources and employee benefit and other business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other coaching, tools and other resources, training and education on leadership, governance, human resources, employee benefits, data security and privacy, insurance, health care and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ resources at SolutionsLawPress.com such as:

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please provide your current contact information and preferences including your preferred e-mail by creating or updating your profile here.

©2016 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.™  All other rights reserved.

 


IRS Invites Input On Application of New Tax Exemption Requirements For Hospital Organizations Added By Affordable Care Act

May 28, 2010

  

July 22, 2010 is the deadline for non-profit hospital organizations and other concerned persons to share comments with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on the proper construction and application of additional requirements imposed under new Internal Revenue Code (Code) § 501(r)(1) requires that “hospital organizations” meet to qualify as tax-exempt charitable entities. The new Code § 501(r)(1) requirements were added to the Code by section 9007(a) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act) enacted March 23, 2010, Pub. L. No. 111-148 as part of its sweeping health care reforms.  The Affordable Care Act also added new Code § 4959, which imposes an excise tax for failures to meet certain of the new Code § 501(r) requirements, and added reporting requirements under Code § 6033(b) related to sections 501(r) and 4959. 

The added requirements of Code § 501(r) generally will apply on a facility-by-facility basis to: (1) an organization that operates a facility required by a State to be licensed, registered, or similarly recognized as a hospital; and (2) any other organization that the Secretary determines has the provision of hospital care as its principal function or purpose constituting the basis for its exemption under section 501(c)(3). 

The IRS today (May 27, 2010) released an advanced copy of a request for comments on the application of certain of these requirements scheduled for publication as Notice 2010-39  in IRB 2010-24 on June 14, 2010. 

For Assistance With Health Industry Concerns 

If your organization needs advice or assistance analyzing or responding to the requirements of Code § 501 or other provisions of the Affordable Care Act, responding to the request for commences, or with other health care matters, contact Cynthia Marcotte Stamer at (469) 767-8872 or via e-mail here.  

Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Exempt Organization Vice-Coordinator of the Southern States IRS TEGE Council, a Council Member of the ABA Joint Committee On Employee Benefits Council, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section, the former Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas and former Board President of the Richardson Development Center for Children (now Warren Center), Ms. Stamer has more than 22 years experience advising health industry clients about health care operations, regulatory and compliance, reimbursement, staffing, risk management, public policy and other matters.    A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry matters, Ms. Stamer advises hospitals and other health industry clients about responding to and using these and other quality measures and other related concerns.  Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry quality, regulatory, reimbursement, and other operations, risk management and public policy concerns.  Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, World At Work, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.  For additional information about Ms. Stamer, her experience, involvements, programs or publications, see here.    

Other Recent Developments 

If you found this information of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing some of the following recent Updates available online by clicking on the article title: 

For More Information 

We hope that this information is useful to you.  If you need assistance evaluating or responding to the Health Care Reform Law or health care compliance, risk management, transactional, operational, reimbursement, or public policy concerns, please contact the author of this update, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, at (469) 767-8872, cstamer@Solutionslawyer.net.  

Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section and the former Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, Ms. Stamer has more than 22 years experience advising health industry clients about these and other matters.  A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry and human resources matters, Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about these and other related concerns.  Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, and other operations and risk management concerns.  Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, World At Work, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.  For additional information about Ms. Stamer, her experience, involvements, programs or publications, see here.   

You can review other recent health care and internal controls resources and additional information about the health industry and other experience of Ms. Stamer here.  If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile at here or e-mailing this information here. To unsubscribe, e-mail here

©2010 Solutions Law Press.  All rights reserved.


HHS Delays 2010 HHS Federal Poverty Rate Update To March 1, 2010

January 22, 2010

Rates Often Impact Federal Low Income & Other Charity Programs

By Cynthia Marcotte Stamer

Health care, educational and other charity care and other organizations participating in federal programs that determine eligibility based on the Federal Poverty Rate may continue to rely on 2009 Federal Poverty Rates until at least March 1, 2010.  However these federal program participants and other organizations and programs that otherwise rely on Federal Poverty Rates for purposes of making eligibility, sliding scale fees or other determinations will want to watch for the updated guidelines and make appropriate updates as necessary when the new guidelines are released over the next few months.

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) usually issues annual updates to the Federal Poverty Rates in January.  However, HHS announced January 22, 2010 that its annual update of Federal Poverty Rates for 2010 will be delayed until at least March 1, 2010.   As a result of this announcement, 2009 Federal Poverty Rates will remain in effect for the time being until at least March 1, 2010.

Health care organizations and a wide range of other organizations and programs use the Federal Poverty Guidelines to decide program eligibility or fees.  Many federal programs use the federal poverty guidelines as one criterion for federal program eligibility.  For example, the Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance (SCHIP) programs determine eligibility largely on the basis of whether the applicant’s income is below the federal poverty guidelines.  Other programs determine financial eligibility based on a percentage or multiplier of the federal poverty guidelines (for example, 125 percent of federal poverty guidelines).  In addition, the federal poverty guidelines are used in the immigration context, such as Form I-864 Affidavit of Support.

Under the 2009 Federal Poverty Guidelines continued in force by the HHS announcement, the applicable income amounts under the 2009 Federal Poverty Guideline in the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. are as follows:

2009 Poverty Guidelines for the 48 Contiguous States and the District of Colombia* 
Number of Family Members Poverty Guideline Income
1 $10,830
2 $14,570
3 $18,310
4 $22,050
5 $25,790
6 $29,530
7 $33,270
8 $37,010
8+ Add $3,740 for each additional person.
* Alaska and Hawaii have slightly higher poverty guidelines.

 

In addition to determining eligibility for purposes of many federal programs, many health care and social services organizations, especially non-profit organizations, utilize a sliding fee scale or fee waiver based on the federal poverty guidelines.  In addition, many health care organizations base their charitable care policies on the federal poverty guidelines.  For programs where the use of federal poverty guidelines is optional, organizations may want to evaluate whether business or operational needs or other considerations merit any adjustment or use of alternative standards at this time.

While use of the federal poverty guidelines is not mandated by law except by federally funded programs, the Joint Commission as part of its accreditation and survey process may ask whether the organization has utilized the most recent update to the federal poverty guidelines in its sliding scale or fee waiver policies.  Therefore, hospitals and other organizations subject to Joint Commission or other accreditation relying on the Federal Poverty Guidelines should review their charity care or fee waiver policies and monitor for planned updates.

Solutions Law Press author and Curran Tomko and Tarski LLP Health Care Practice Chair Cynthia Marcotte Stamer has extensive experience advising and assisting health care practitioners and other businesses and business leaders to establish, administer, investigate and defend health care fraud and other compliance and internal control policies and practices to reduce risk under federal and state health care and other laws. You can get more information about the CTT Health Care Practice and Ms. Stamer’s health industry experience here.

If you need assistance with these or other compliance concerns, wish to inquire about arranging for compliance audit or training, or need legal representation on other matters please contact Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, CTT Health Care Practice Group Chair, at cstamer@cttlegal.com, 214.270.2402or another Curran Tomko Tarski LLP attorney of your choice.

Other Helpful Resources & Other Information

We hope that this information is useful to you.   If you found these updates of interest, you also be interested in other updates on HEAT activities such as the following:

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please register to receive this Solutions Law Press Health Care Update here and be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail- by creating or updating your profile at here. You can access other recent updates and other informative publications and resources provided by Curran Tomko Tarski LLP attorneys and get information about its attorneys’ experience, briefings, speeches and other credentials here.

For important information concerning this communication click here.  If you do not wish to receive these updates in the future, send an e-mail with the word “Remove” in the Subject here.

©2009 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer.  All rights reserved. 


North Texas Healthcare Compliance Professional Association To Meet At Texas Health Resources On October 13

September 29, 2009

NORTH TEXAS HEALTHCARE COMPLIANCE PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION

October 13, 2009 Meeting Reminder

2:00 – 4:00 p.m. at the Texas Health Resources Pavilion

North Texas Health Care Compliance Professional Association’s October 13, 2009 Meeting will feature a participatory Health Care Compliance Roundtable Discussion of Hot Topics moderated by the Erma E. Lee,  JPS Health Network District Compliance Officer and NTPCA President on Tuesday, October 13, 2009 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m at the Texas Health Resources Pavilion located at 612 E. Lamar Blvd., Arlington, TX.  Topics to be discussed include:

  •  HIPAA Data Breach, Red Flag & Other Evolving Privacy & Data Security Obligations & Risks
  •   Office of Civil Rights Health Industry Disability & Other Civil Rights Enforcement
  • Tax-Exemption Issues Including Proposed Form 990 and Exemption Reforms In Health Care Reform
  • Health Care Fraud Enforcement
  • Other Hot Developments

Come catch up on these and other new developments and exchange thoughts and insights with other Health Care Compliance Professionals!                       

NTHCPA thanks Texas Health Resources for hosting this month’s meeting.

For additional information, please contact NTHCPA Vice-President Cynthia Marcotte Stamer at (214) 270-2402 or by e-mail at cstamer@solutionslawyer.net.

 We look forward to seeing you there!

About the NTHCPA

NTHCPA exists to champion ethical practice and compliance standards and to provide the necessary resources for ethics and compliance Professionals and others in North Texas who share these principles.

The vision of NTHCPA is to be a pre-eminent compliance and ethics group promoting lasting success and integrity of organizations within North Texas.

To register or update your registration or to receive notice of future meetings, e-mail here .

This communication may be considered a marketing communication for certain purposes.  If you wish to update your e-mail for purposes of or would prefer not to receive future e-mail concerning meetings or other activities of the North Texas Healthcare Compliance Professionals Association or other marketing and promotional mailings from it, please send an email with the word “unsubscribe” in its subject heading to here.


Baucus Health Care Reform Proposal Calls For Significant Tightening In Tax-Exemption Rules

September 22, 2009

Senate Finance Set To Begin Markup Sessions Today – Repeal of Rebuttable Presumption Rule In Reasonable Compensation Rules, Other Tightening of Requirements Threatened

With Senate Finance Committee meetings to mark up Chairman Max Baucus’ health care reform proposal as outlined in his 220-page “Chairman’s Mark of America’s Healthy Future Act of 2009” (the “Baucus Proposal”) scheduled to begin today (September 22, 2009), tax-exempt health care and other non-profit organizations should evaluate carefully proposed amendments that could impact their tax-exempt status or related obligations.  The proposed amendments have serious implications for non-profits within and beyond the health care industry.

Markup Scheduled To Begin Tuesday

The Senate Committee on Finance began meeting today (September 22, 2009) to negotiate how to convert into proposed legislation the Baucus Proposal introduced by Committee Chairman Max Baucus on September 16, 2009, the text of which may be reviewed here.

Since no text of the proposed legislation itself has been released yet, it is impossible to fully evaluate the specific nature and implications of the Baucus Proposal.  While this week’s planned Senate Finance Committee mark up will further clarify these matters, a review of the description of changes proposed by Chairman Baucus in the Baucus Proposals nevertheless provides significant insight of what health care organizations can expect to be discussed and, in all likelihood incorporated into the draft legislation ultimately proposed in some form.  Accordingly, tax-exempt health care organizations should carefully evaluate and act promptly to share their input with members of the Senate Finance Committee and other members of Congress about a series of proposed amendments that would impact their tax-treatment and other responsibilities.

All Tax-Exempts Should Monitor Proposals To Shift Burden Of Proof On Compensation Reasonability & Expanded IRS Powers

Among a multitude of proposed tax amendments, tax-exempt organizations inside and outside the health care industry will want to keep a a close eye on discussions and proposals to amend the Baucus Proposal to further modify the tax-exemption requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and other tax-exempt organizations.  Late last week, Ranking Member Senator Chuck Grassley submitted a proposal to amend the Baucus Proposal to further tighten tax-exemption requirements in two material respects likely to generally concern tax-exempt organizations:

  • For the stated purpose of avoiding wasteful legal challenges to the management and governance questions on the revised Form 990, to specifically grant statutory authority to the Internal Revenue Service to ask management and governance questions on the Form 990; and
  • To make it easier for the Internal Revenue Service to challenge as unreasonable compensation payments made by tax-exempt entities by shifting the burden to the taxpayer of proving the reasonability of compensation and removing the burden currently borne by the Internal Revenue Service of going forward with the evidence on comparability.  This would be accomplished by overruling the rebuttable presumption of reasonableness currently set forth in Treasury Regulation § 53.4958-6 of the intermediate sanctions rules and replacing it with a requirement that public charities due diligence demonstrate that their compensation payments meet the 3 current elements of the presumption:
    • Review by an authorized body made of members without a conflict of interest
    • Use of appropriate data as to comparability and
    • Adequate and contemporaneous documentation. This amendment is expected to raise revenue, according to the summary.

Given the potential implications of these proposed amendments, tax-exempt health care and other organizations should keep a close eye on proposed tax provisions of the Baucus Proposal and other related proposals.

Proposal To Tighten Other Tax-Exemption & Reporting Requirements For Tax-Exempt Hospitals

While the Senate Finance Committee as of yet has not released text of the proposed legislation itself, a review of the description of changes proposed by Chairman Baucus in the Baucus Proposals and other subsequently proposed amendments to the Baucus Proposal reveal other plans to materially change the tax-exemption qualification, governance and reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals beyond the proposal to create CO-OPs.  Among other things, the Baucus Proposal calls for the Internal Revenue Code § 501(c)(3) and its related provisions to be amended to require tax-exempt hospitals:

  • To conduct or participate in and share with the public a community-needs analysis with input from a broad cross section of the community at least once every 3 years and thereafter to report on its implementation, including explaining where applicable why identified needs were unaddressed.  These additional requirements would supplement rather than replace existing community benefit standards already generally applicable to charitable entities
  • To provide non-discriminatory emergency care
  • To have, implement and widely disseminate a written financial assistance policy  defining among other things:
    • The rules for determining who qualifies for financial assistance
    • How the hospital determines amounts to be billed to patients in manner that provides for patient discounts to be based on Medicare rates, “best” commercial rates or other approved statutory measures rather than “chargemaster rates”
    • Require hospital to notify patients of the financial assistance policy on admission, on bills and in telephone calls of its financial assistance policy before initiating various collection actions or reporting the account to a credit rating agency
  • To make its audited financial statements (and where applicable, the consolidated financial report of any entity of which it is a part) available widely
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to conduct a SEC-type review of each 501(c)(3) hospital’s community benefit activities at least once every three years based on data reported on Schedule H of the Form 990
  • The IRS and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)  to report annually to Congress on community benefit activities of non-governmental tax-exempt hospitals, charity care, bad debt, and unreimbursed costs of government programs (means-tested and non-means-tested) incurred by tax-exempt, taxable, and governmental hospitals.

CO-Ops As Health Coverage Alternative

Much more widely discussed is the Chairman’s CO-OP proposal.  The Baucus Proposal calls for the creation of a new vehicle to provide an alternative source of health care coverage called “CO-Ops.”  As contemplated by the Baucus Proposal, CO-Ops would be associations controlled by a beneficiary board unrelated to existing organizations providing health insurance as of July 16, 2009.  Subject to their meeting non-inurement and other common existing requirements for charitable status as well as other conditions, CO-Ops would be able to apply for tax-exempt status as well as federal funding.

New Taxes and Fees On Insurers & Others

The Baucus Proposal proposes to finance its health care reforms through a variety of mechanisms including, excise taxes and penalties on employers and individuals that fail to purchase the government specified health care package, taxes on premiums paid for health insurance coverage in excess of certain specified annual limits, the imposition of certain premium taxes and “sector fees” on healthcare insurers (with some exceptions possible under certain circumstances for certain 501(c)(3) and (c)(4) HMOs not providing commercial-type insurance within the meaning of Section 501(m)).

Other Baucus Proposal Highlights

In its current summary form, the 220-page Baucus Proposal includes a host of other sweeping reforms, which are certain to be further expanded and refined during this week’s scheduled Senate Finance Committee markup session.  Many of these other proposed reforms were highlighted in an overview of the Baucus Proposal published hereYou can join the discussion of these and other proposed health care forms and exchange updates and other resources about health care reform and related concerns by registering to participate in the Coalition For Responsible Health Care Policy Group on Linkedin.

Other Recent Developments

If you found this information of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing some of the following recent Solution Law Press Health Care Updates available online by clicking on the article title below:

 

For More Information

We hope that this information is useful to you.  If you need assistance with health care compliance, risk management, reimbursement, staffing, credentialing, transactional, operational or public policy concerns, please contact the author of this update, Curran Tomko Tarski LLP Health Practice Group Chair, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, at (214) 270‑2402, cstamer@cttlegal.com or your other favorite Curran Tomko Tarski LLP Partner.  Ms. Stamer has extensive experience advising clients and writes and speaks extensively on these and other health industry and related matters. 

You can review other recent health care and internal controls resources and additional information about the health industry and other experience of Ms. Stamer here.  If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile at here, by e-mailing this information to support@cttlegal.com or by participating in the SLP Health Care Risk Management & Operations Group on LinkedIn.

©2009 Curran Tomko Tarski LLP.  All rights reserved.


Baucus’ America’s Healthy Future Act of 2009 Calls For Significant Tightening of Tax Exemption Rules

September 21, 2009

Senate Finance Set To Begin Markup Session Proposal September 22 – Repeal of Rebuttable Presumption Rule In Reasonable Compensation Rules, Other Tightening of Requirements Threatened

With Senate Finance Committee meetings to mark up Chairman Max Baucus’ health care reform proposal as outlined in his 220-page “Chairman’s Mark of America’s Healthy Future Act of 2009” (the “Baucus Proposal”) scheduled to begin tomorrow (September 22, 2009), tax-exempt health care and other non-profit organizations should evaluate carefully proposed amendments that could impact their tax-exempt status or related obligations in addition to the widely-discussed proposal to create “Consumer Operated and Oriented Plans (CO-OPs).

Markup Scheduled To Begin Tuesday

The Senate Committee on Finance plans on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 to hash out how to convert into proposed legislation the health care reform proposal outlined in the “Chairman’s Mark America’s Healthy Future Act of 2009” introduced by Committee Chairman Max Baucus on September 16, 2009, the text of which may be reviewed here.

Since no text of the proposed legislation itself has been released yet, it is impossible to fully evaluate the specific nature and implications of the Baucus Proposal.  While this week’s planned Senate Finance Committee mark up will further clarify these matters, a review of the description of changes proposed by Chairman Baucus in the Baucus Proposals nevertheless provides significant insight of what health care organizations can expect to be discussed and, in all likelihood incorporated into the draft legislation ultimately proposed.  Accordingly, tax-exempt health care organizations should carefully evaluate and act promptly to share their input with members of the Senate Finance Committee and other members of Congress about a series of proposed amendments that would impact their tax-treatment and other responsibilities.

Proposal To Tighten Tax-Exemption & Reporting

Requirements For Tax-Exempt Hospitals

While the Senate Finance Committee as of yet has not released text of the proposed legislation itself, a review of the description of changes proposed by Chairman Baucus in the Baucus Proposals and other subsequently proposed amendments to the Baucus Proposal reveal plans to materially change the tax-exemption qualification, governance and reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals beyond the proposal to create CO-OPs.  Among other things, the Baucus Proposal calls for the Internal Revenue Code § 50!(c)(3) and its related provisions to be amended to require:

  • The hospital to conduct or participate in and share with the public a community-needs analysis with input from a broad cross section of the community at least once every 3 years and thereafter to report on its implementation, including explaining where applicable why identified needs were unaddressed.  These additional requirements would supplement rather than replace existing community benefit standards already generally applicable to charitable entities
  • The hospital to provide non-discriminatory emergency care
  • The hospital to have, implement and widely disseminate a written financial assistance policy  defining among other things:
    • The rules for determining who qualifies for financial assistance
    • How the hospital determines amounts to be billed to patients in manner that provides for patient discounts to be based on Medicare rates, “best” commercial rates or other approved statutory measures rather than “chargemaster rates”
    • Require hospital to notify patients of the financial assistance policy on admission, on bills and in telephone calls of its financial assistance policy before initiating various collection actions or reporting the account to a credit rating agency
  • The hospital make its audited financial statements (and where applicable, the consolidated financial report of any entity of which it is a part) available widely
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to conduct a SEC-type review of each 501(c)(3) hospital’s community benefit activities at least once every three years based on data reported on Schedule H of the Form 990
  • The IRS and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)  to report annually to Congress on community benefit activities of non-governmental tax-exempt hospitals, charity care, bad debt, and unreimbursed costs of government programs (means-tested and non-means-tested) incurred by tax-exempt, taxable, and governmental hospitals.

In addition to the proposed amendments included in the Baucus Proposal as originally introduced, health care organizations also will need a close eye on discussions and proposals to amend the Baucus Proposal to further modify the tax-exemption requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and other health care organizations.  For instance, late last week, Ranking Member Senator Chuck Grassley submitted a proposal to amend the Baucus Proposal to further tighten requirements for tax-exempt health care organizations:

  • For the stated purpose of avoiding wasteful legal challenges to the management and governance questions on the revised Form 990, to specifically grant statutory authority to the Internal Revenue Service to ask management and governance questions on the Form 990; and
  • To make it easier for the Internal Revenue Service to challenge as unreasonable compensation payments made by tax-exempt entities by shifting the burden to the taxpayer of proving the reasonability of compensation and removing the burden currently borne by the Internal Revenue Service of going forward with the evidence on comparability.  This would be accomplished by overruling the rebuttable presumption of reasonableness currently set forth in Treasury Regulation § 53.4958-6 of the intermediate sanctions rules and replacing it with a requirement that public charities due diligence demonstrate that their compensation payments meet the 3 current elements of the presumption:
    • Review by an authorized body made of members without a conflict of interest
    • Use of appropriate data as to comparability and
    • Adequate and contemporaneous documentation. This amendment is expected to raise revenue, according to the summary.

With these provisions already targeting their tax-exempt status, tax-exempt hospitals and other non-profits and others likely to surface as the legislative discussion proceeds, tax-exempt health care and other organizations should keep a close eye on proposed tax provisions of the Baucus Proposal and other related proposals.

CO-Ops As Health Coverage Alternative

Much more widely discussed is the Chairman’s CO-OP proposal.  The Baucus Proposal calls for the creation of a new vehicle to provide an alternative source of health care coverage called  “CO-Ops.”  As contemplated by the Baucus Proposal, CO-Ops would be associations controlled by a beneficiary board unrelated to existing organizations providing health insurance as of July 16, 2009.  Subject to their meeting non-inurement and other common existing requirements for charitable status as well as other conditions, CO-Ops would be able to apply for tax-exempt status as well as federal funding.

New Taxes and Fees On Insurers & Others

The Baucus Proposal proposes to finance its health care reforms through a variety of mechanisms including, excise taxes and penalties on employers and individuals that fail to purchase the government specified health care package, taxes on premiums paid for health insurance coverage in excess of certain specified annual limits, the imposition of certain premium taxes and “sector fees” on healthcare insurers (with some exceptions possible under certain circumstances for certain 501(c)(3) and (c)(4) HMOs not providing commercial-type insurance within the meaning of Section 501(m)).

Other Baucus Proposal Highlights

In its current summary form, the 220-page Baucus Proposal includes a host of other sweeping reforms, which are certain to be further expanded and refined during this week’s scheduled Senate Finance Committee markup session.  Many of these other proposed reforms were highlighted in an overview of the Baucus Proposal published hereYou can join the discussion of these and other proposed health care forms and exchange updates and other resources about health care reform and related concerns by registering to participate in the Coalition For Responsible Health Care Policy Group on Linkedin.

 

Other Recent Developments

If you found this information of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing some of the following recent Solution Law Press Health Care Updates available online by clicking on the article title below:

For More Information

We hope that this information is useful to you.  If you need assistance with these or other health care public policy, regulatory, compliance, risk management, workforce and other staffing, transactional or operational concerns, please contact the author of this update, Curran Tomko Tarski LLP Health Practice Group Chair, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, at (214) 270‑2402, cstamer@cttlegal.com, Ms. Stamer has extensive experience advising clients and writes and speaks extensively on these and other health industry and other reimbursement, operations, internal controls and risk management matters. 

Ms. Stamer has extensive experience in these and other health industry related representation.  You can review other recent health care and related resources and additional information about the health industry and other experience of Ms. Stamer here

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile at here, or e-mailing this information to cstamer@cttlegal.com, and/or by participating in the SLP Health Care Risk Management & Operations Group on LinkedIn.

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile at here or e-mailing this information here.  To unsubscribe, e-mail here.

©2009 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer.  All rights reserved.


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