HHS Picks Hargan As Acting HHS Secretary

October 11, 2017

President Trump has appointed Eric D. Hargan Acting Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Hargan, who was just sworn into office as Deputy Secretary of HHS on Oct. 6, 2017, takes over the duties of former Secretary Dr. Tom Price, who recently resigned in response to criticism about his expenditures for charter flights.

Before joining HHS, Mr. Hargan was an attorney, most recently a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Chicago office in the Health and FDA Business department, where he focused his practice on transactions, healthcare regulations and government relations. He represented investors, companies, and individuals in healthcare investments and issues across the entire sector.

From 2003 to 2007, Mr. Hargan served at HHS in a variety of capacities, ultimately holding the position of Acting Deputy Secretary. During his tenure at HHS, Mr. Hargan also served as the Department’s Regulatory Policy Officer, overseeing the development and approval of all HHS, CMS, and FDA regulations and significant guidances.

Prior to this role, he served HHS as Deputy General Counsel. More recently, he was tapped by Governor Bruce Rauner to serve during transition as lead co-chair for Gov. Rauner’s Healthcare and Human Services committee.

During his time in Illinois, Mr. Hargan taught at Loyola Law School in Chicago, focusing on administrative law and healthcare regulations. He was a member of the U.S. government team at the inaugural U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue in Beijing in 2006-2007, worked with the State Department’s Bureau of Arms Control to advance biosecurity in developing nations, and initiated and led the HHS team that developed the first responses to international food safety and importation issues in 2007.

He received his B.A. cum laude from Harvard University, and his J.D. from Columbia University Law School, where he was Senior Editor of the Columbia Law Review. Mr. Hargan also received a Certificate in International Law from the Parker School of Foreign and Comparative Law at Columbia University.

Before returning to Washington, D.C., Mr. Hargan lived in the suburbs of Chicago with his wife, Emily, and their two sons.

About The Author

Recognized by her peers as a Martindale-Hubble “AV-Preeminent” (Top 1%) and “Top Rated Lawyer” with special recognition LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell® as “LEGAL LEADER™ Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law and Labor and Employment Law; as among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” for her work in the fields of “Labor & Employment,” “Tax: Erisa & Employee Benefits,” “Health Care” and “Business and Commercial Law” by D Magazine, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer is a practicing attorney board certified in labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and management consultant, author, public policy advocate and lecturer widely known for 30+ years of health industry and other management work, public policy leadership and advocacy, coaching, teachings, and publications.

Ms. Stamer works with health industry and related businesses and their management, employee benefit plans, governments and other organizations deal with all aspects of human resources and workforce, internal controls and regulatory compliance, change management, disaster and other crisis preparedness and response, and other performance and operations management and compliance. Her experienced includes career long involvement in advising and defending health industry and other organizations about disaster and other crisis preparation, response and mitigation arising from natural and man-made disasters, government enforcement, financial distress, workplace emergencies and accidents, data breach and other cybersecurity and other events.  For additional information about Ms. Stamer, see here, e-mail her here or telephone Ms. Stamer at (214) 452-8297.

About Solutions Law Press, Inc.™

Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ provides human resources and employee benefit and other business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other coaching, tools and other resources, training and education on leadership, governance, human resources, employee benefits, data security and privacy, insurance, health care and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ resources here.

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information including your preferred e-mail by creating your profile here.

NOTICE: These statements and materials are for general informational and purposes only. They do not establish an attorney-client relationship, are not legal advice or an offer or commitment to provide legal advice, and do not serve as a substitute for legal advice. Readers are urged to engage competent legal counsel for consultation and representation in light of the specific facts and circumstances presented in their unique circumstance at any particular time. No comment or statement in this publication is to be construed as legal advise or an admission. The author reserves the right to qualify or retract any of these statements at any time. Likewise, the content is not tailored to any particular situation and does not necessarily address all relevant issues. Because the law is rapidly evolving and rapidly evolving rules makes it highly likely that subsequent developments could impact the currency and completeness of this discussion. The author and publisher disclaim, and have no responsibility to provide any update or otherwise notify any participant of any such change, limitation, or other condition that might affect the suitability of reliance upon these materials or information otherwise conveyed in connection with this program. Readers may not rely upon, are solely responsible for, and assume the risk and all liabilities resulting from their use of this publication.

Circular 230 Compliance. The following disclaimer is included to ensure that we comply with U.S. Treasury Department Regulations. Any statements contained herein are not intended or written by the writer to be used, and nothing contained herein can be used by you or any other person, for the purpose of (1) avoiding penalties that may be imposed under federal tax law, or (2) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related transaction or matter addressed herein.

©2017 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ For information about republication, please contact the author directly. All other rights reserved.


Christus Pays $12.24M Settlement Resolves False Claims Act Charges From “Donations” To New Mexico

September 11, 2017

CHRISTUS St. Vincent Regional Medical Center (St. Vincent) and its partner, CHRISTUS Health (CHRISTUS), have agreed to pay $12.24 million, plus interest  to resolve charges by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and U.S Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) they violated the False Claims Act by making illegal donations to county governments that the counties used to fund the state share of Medicaid payments to the hospital.  The settlement announced  September 1, 2017 highlights the needs for States and private healthcare providers to use care to ensure that creative partnerships don’t violate federal Medicare or other program requirements as well as the risk that the False Claims Act or other whistleblower rules will incentivize disgruntled employees or other service providers to bring aggressive conduct to the attention of federal officials.

The settlement resolves allegations made in U.S. ex rel. Stepan v. Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center Corp. et al., Civil Action No. 11-cv-572 (D.N.M.) that St. Vincent and CHRISTUS allegedly caused the State of New Mexico to present false Medicaid claims in violation of the False Claims Act by making non-bona fide donations to the State of New Mexico that New Mexico improperly used to fulfill the requirement that the State pay 25% “matching” share  to fund the New Mexico Sole Community Provider Program (SCP) between 2001 and 2009.

Under the now defunct SCP Program, federal law required that New Mexico fund 25% of the costs of the SCP program to qualify for reimbursement from the federal government for approximately 75 percent of its health care expenditures under the SCP program. Under federal law, New Mexico’s 25 percent “matching” share of SCP program payments had to consist of state or county funds, and not impermissible “donations” from private hospitals. Congress enacted this restriction on the use of private hospital funds to satisfy state Medicaid obligations to curb possible abuses and ensure that states have sufficient incentive to curb rising Medicaid costs.

The charges resolved by the settlement originally were brought in a qui tam lawsuit filed by a former Los Alamos County, New Mexico Indigent Healthcare Administrator .  The whistleblower will receive $2.249 million as her share of the recovery in this case.

The prosecution and its settlement drive home both the importance for States receiving Medicaid funds and private health care partners providing services to patients reimbursed by these funds to use care to comply with all applicable program requirements, as well as the continuing risk of exposure and resulting liability from whistleblower claims brought by unhappy employees or others looking to use their knowledge of questionable conduct to realize profitable recoveries.

About the Author

Recognized by her peers as a Martindale-Hubble “AV-Preeminent” (Top 1%) and “Top Rated Lawyer” with special recognition LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell® as “LEGAL LEADER™ Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law and Labor and Employment Law; as among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” for her work in the fields of “Labor & Employment,” “Tax: Erisa & Employee Benefits,” “Health Care” and “Business and Commercial Law” by D Magazine, Cynthia Marcotte Stamer is a practicing attorney board certified in labor and employment law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and management consultant, author, public policy advocate and lecturer widely known for health industry and other management work, public policy leadership and advocacy, coaching, teachings, and publications. Ms. Stamer works with health industry and related businesses and their management, employee benefit plans, governments and other organizations deal with all aspects of human resources and workforce, internal controls and regulatory compliance, change management and other performance and operations management and compliance. For additional information about Ms. Stamer, see here, e-mail her here or telephone Ms. Stamer at (214) 452-8297.

About Solutions Law Press, Inc.™

Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ provides human resources and employee benefit and other business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other coaching, tools and other resources, training and education on leadership, governance, human resources, employee benefits, data security and privacy, insurance, health care and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ resources here.
If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information including your preferred e-mail by creating your profile here.

NOTICE: These statements and materials are for general informational and purposes only. They do not establish an attorney-client relationship, are not legal advice or an offer or commitment to provide legal advice, and do not serve as a substitute for legal advice. Readers are urged to engage competent legal counsel for consultation and representation in light of the specific facts and circumstances presented in their unique circumstance at any particular time. No comment or statement in this publication is to be construed as legal advise or an admission. The author reserves the right to qualify or retract any of these statements at any time. Likewise, the content is not tailored to any particular situation and does not necessarily address all relevant issues. Because the law is rapidly evolving and rapidly evolving rules makes it highly likely that subsequent developments could impact the currency and completeness of this discussion. The presenter and the program sponsor disclaim, and have no responsibility to provide any update or otherwise notify any participant of any such change, limitation, or other condition that might affect the suitability of reliance upon these materials or information otherwise conveyed in connection with this program. Readers may not rely upon, are solely responsible for, and assume the risk and all liabilities resulting from their use of this publication.

Circular 230 Compliance. The following disclaimer is included to ensure that we comply with U.S. Treasury Department Regulations. Any statements contained herein are not intended or written by the writer to be used, and nothing contained herein can be used by you or any other person, for the purpose of (1) avoiding penalties that may be imposed under federal tax law, or (2) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related transaction or matter addressed herein.

©2017 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ For information about republication, please contact the author directly. All other rights reserved.


CMS Proposes Cutbacks To Medicare Bundled Payment Program

August 15, 2017

A Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule scheduled for publication in the August 18, 2017 Federal Register will propose to reduce the number of mandatory geographic areas for the joint bundled payment program and cancel the cardiac bundled payment program model for determining reimbursement of providers for care under Medicare as well as make other refinements to the bundled payment program scheduled to take effect in January.

Widely criticized by many providers including department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Tom Price, the mandatory bundled payment program presently is scheduled to take effect in January, 2018 after multiple delays.

According to the advanced copy of the proposed rule released by CMS on August 15, 2017, the proposed rule will propose among other things the following changes to the bundled payment program:

  • Cancel the Episode Payment Models (EPMs) and Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) incentive payment model and rescind the regulations governing these models;
  • Revise certain aspects of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, including: giving certain hospitals selected for participation in the CJR model a one-time option to choose whether to continue their participation in the model;
  • Make technical refinements and clarifications for certain payment, reconciliation and quality provisions; and
  • Increase the pool of eligible clinicians that qualify as affiliated practitioners under the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) track.

Healthcare providers and others interested in the proposed changes should carefully review the proposed changes and provide feedback as soon as possible  and no later than the October 17, 2017 deadline the proposed regulation sets for submitting comments.

About The Author

The author of this update, attorney Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, is AV-Preeminent (the highest) rated attorney repeatedly recognized for her nearly 30 years of experience and knowledge representing and advising healthcare, health plan and other health industry and others on these and other regulatory, workforce, risk management, technology, public policy and operations matters as a Martindale-Hubble as a “LEGAL LEADER™” and “Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law, Labor and Employment Law, and Business & Commercial Law and among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” by D Magazine.

An American Bar Foundation, American College of Employee Benefits Counsel, and Texas Bar Foundation Fellow, current American Bar Association (ABA) International Section Life Sciences Committee Vice Chair, former scribe for the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits (JCEB) Annual OCR Agency Meeting and JCEB Council Representative, former Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section,  the former Board President and Treasurer of the Richardson Development Center for Children Early Childhood Intervention Agency, and past  Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, and Board Certified in Labor & Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, Ms. Stamer’s health industry experience includes advising hospitals, nursing home, home health, rehabilitation and other health care providers and health industry clients to establish and administer compliance and risk management policies; prevent, conduct and investigate, and respond to peer review and other quality concerns; and to respond to Board of Medicine, Department of Aging & Disability, Drug Enforcement Agency, OCR Privacy and Civil Rights, Department of Labor, IRS, HHS, DOD and other health care industry investigation, enforcement and other compliance, public policy, regulatory, staffing, and other operations and risk management and a broad range of other legal and operational concerns. Her clients include public and private health care providers, health insurers, health plans, technology and other vendors, and others.

A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry concerns, Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about compliance and internal controls, workforce and medical  staff performance, quality, governance, reimbursement, and other risk management and operational matters. Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, technology, public policy, reimbursement and other operations and risk management concerns. Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.

You can get more information about her health industry experience here or contact Ms. Stamer via telephone at (469) 767-8872 or via e-mail here.

About Solutions Law Press Inc.™

Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns.

If you found these updates of interest, you may be interested in other recent Solutions Law Press, Inc. updates, publications, training program, advocacy and other initiatives available here.

Go here to register to receive other Solutions Law Press, Inc. updates and announcements about other upcoming briefings, training or other programs, products, services, and activities or to learn more about Solutions Law Press, Inc., its publications, programs and training, PROJECT COPE: Coalition on Patient Empowerment community service and education projects, event management and other resources and services.

For important information concerning this communication see here. THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMER IS INCLUDED TO COMPLY WITH AND IN RESPONSE TO U.S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR 230 REGULATIONS. ANY STATEMENTS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE NOT INTENDED OR WRITTEN BY THE WRITER TO BE USED, AND NOTHING CONTAINED HEREIN CAN BE USED BY YOU OR ANY OTHER PERSON, FOR THE PURPOSE OF (1) AVOIDING PENALTIES THAT MAY BE IMPOSED UNDER FEDERAL TAX LAW, OR (2) PROMOTING, MARKETING OR RECOMMENDING TO ANOTHER PARTY ANY TAX-RELATED TRANSACTION OR MATTER ADDRESSED HEREIN.

©2017 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, P.C. Non-exclusive license to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc. All other rights reserved.


CMS Releases 2017 Provider Payment Program Hardship Exception Application

August 4, 2017

The Quality Payment Program Hardship Exception Application for the 2017 transition year now is available on the Quality Payment Program website.

MIPS eligible clinicians and groups may qualify for a reweighting of their Advancing Care Information performance category score to 0% of the final score, and can submit a hardship exception application, for one of the following specified reasons:

  • Insufficient internet connectivity
  • Extreme and uncontrollable circumstances
  • Lack of control over the availability of Certified EHR Technology (CEHRT).

Some MIPS eligible clinicians who are considered Special Status, will be automatically reweighted (or, exempted in the case of MIPS eligible clinicians participating in a MIPS APM), do not need to submit a Quality Payment Program Hardship Exception Application.
In addition to submitting an application via the Quality Payment Program website, clinicians also may contact the Quality Payment Program Service Center and work with a representative to verbally submit an application.

To submit an application, a physician or other applying clinician will need:

  • The Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) for group applications or National Provider Identifier (NPI) for individual applications;
  • Contact information for the person working on behalf of the individual clinician or group, including first and last name, e-mail address, and telephone number; and
  • Selection of hardship exception category (listed above) and supplemental information.

Applicants for a hardship exception based on the Extreme and Uncontrollable Circumstance category, also must select one of the following and provide a start and end date of when the circumstance occurred:

  • Disaster (e.g., a natural disaster in which the CEHRT was damaged or destroyed);
  • Practice or hospital closure;
  • Severe financial distress (bankruptcy or debt restructuring);
  • EHR certification/vendor issues (CEHRT issues)

Once an application is submitted, CMS will send the applicant a confirmation email acknowledging receipt of the application and when it is pending, approved, or dismissed. Applications will be processed on a rolling basis.

Physician and other clinicians or practices interested in pursuing an exemption should act promptly.

About The Author

Cynthia Marcotte Stamer is a Martindale-Hubble “AV-Preeminent (Top 1%) rated practicing attorney and management consultant, health industry public policy advocate, widely published author and lecturer, recognized for her nearly 30 years’ of work on health industry and other privacy and data security and other health care, health benefit, health policy and regulatory affairs and other health industry legal and operational as a LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell® “LEGAL LEADER™ and “Top Rated Lawyer,” in Health Care Law and Labor and Employment Law; a D Magazine “Best Lawyers In Dallas” in the fields of “Health Care,” “Labor & Employment,” “Tax: Erisa & Employee Benefits” and “Business and Commercial Law,” a Fellow in the American Bar Foundation, the Texas Bar Foundation and the American College of Employee Benefit Counsel.

Technical advisor to the National Physicians Council for Healthcare Policy, Vice President of the North Texas Healthcare Professionals Association, American Bar Association (ABA) International Life Sciences Committee Vice Chair, Policy; Scribe for ABA JCEB annual agency meeting with OCR, Ms. Stamer is well-known for her extensive work and leadership throughout her career on healthcare and health policy, regulatory, operations and other industry topics. Her clients include public and private healthcare systems, hospitals and other healthcare facilities, health care providers, health insurers, health plans, employers, health and other technology and other vendors, communities and others.

In addition to representing and advising these organizations, she also speaks extensively and conducts training on health care and other privacy and data security and many other matters.

Beyond these involvements, Ms. Stamer also is active in the leadership of a broad range of other health care and other professional and civic organizations. Through these and other involvements, she helps develop and build solutions, build consensus, garner funding and other resources, manage compliance and other operations, and take other actions to identify promote tangible improvements in health care and other policy and operational areas.

For additional information about Ms. Stamer, see here or contact Ms. Stamer directly by e-mail here or by telephone at (469) 767-8872. ©2017 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer.  Limited, non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.  All other rights reserved.


Healthcare Fraud Exposures Significant & Rising For Owners, Execs & Other Leaders

October 17, 2016

Owners, operators, and leaders of health care organizations face an ever-growing imperative to lock down compliance by the organization and its employees and agents both to protect their organizations and its investors and themselves personally against the criminal, civil and administrative sanctions that result when health care organizations or their people break the rules.

The Departmnet of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) increasingly are going after owners, operators and other leaders of healthcare organizations for participating in, failing to act to prevent or inadequately investigating and redressing fraud or other illegal conduct in their organizations or by members of their organization’s team. Leaders and owners need to learn the rules and what to do to manage their risk. Owners and leaders must get informed about their expectations and exposures and learn and take the right steps to adopt compliance plans, monitor and enforce compliance, investigate and redress concerns and deal with these responsibilities and risk

The latest slew of federal health care fraud prosecutions reported by DOJ and OIG during the first two weeks of October illustrate some of the risks owners and executives face when they, their organization or employees or agents violate these rules.  DOJ and federal regulators like OIG have made clear that they construe these rules to require leaders both to abstain from violating these laws and to adopt and administer effective compliance plans, oversight and other actions to train and prevent their employees and agents from violating these rules.  See, e.g., Practical Guidance for Health Care Governing Boards on Compliance Oversight.

Of course, owners and management leaders inevitably face significant financial loss and other fallout if their organizations or members of their teams are found to have violated federal or state health care fraud laws.  Over the past decade, however, owners and leaders increasingly also face growing risks of personal prosecution when their organization or someone on their team breaks the rules.

Owners, executives or other leaders who may be tempted to underesktimate the significance of these warnings should note DOJ’s increasingly aggressive and heavy handed prosecution of owners, executives and other leaders who either directly participate in, or by failing to adopt or administer meaningful compliance and investigation practices, are perceived to have allowed, encouraged or facilitated employees or agents to engage in actions hat DOJ, OIG or other federal regulators consider fraudulent.

DOJ’s growing emphasis on holding health care executives accountable for health care fraud or other violations of federal health care and other laws is clearly reflected in the prosecutions and convictions it announced during the first two weeks of October clearly demonstrate the critical need for health care organization owners, officers and other leaders (executives) to safeguard themselves personally, as well as their organizations against becoming targeted or convicted of health care fraud or other violations of federal health care laws by ensuring their organization adopts and administers effective compliance programs and taking other meaningful, well-documented steps , efforts to ensure the effectiveness of these compliance efforts.

Federal criminal and civil health care fraud laws both prohibit owners, operators and executives from participating in or conspiring to violate federal anti-kickback, anti-referral, false claims and other health care fraud laws, as well as provide various mechanisms that impose liability against owners and executives that fail to adopt and administer appropriate compliance, audit and other oversight and enforcement processes and procedures.  Since October 1, 2016, for instance, DOJ has announced the following healthcare charges, convictions and settlements involving owners and executives.

Of course, the costs and liabilities of federal criminal or civil investigations and prosecutions are only part of the challenges an organization and its leaders generally face when their healthcare organization or its actions are questioned under federal health care fraud or other laws.  Whistleblower or other claims of employees and agents claiming to have been penalized for questioning practices, shareholder or other investor lawsuits, federal program disqualification, loss of position or reputation, the financial and other burdens of responding to and defending investigations and charges and a parade of other horribles that typically attend investigations and prosecutions also often exact a heavy toll on health care organization owners and leaders caught up in federal fraud investigations or prosecutions.

In the face of these growing risks, healthcare owners, executives and other leaders need a clear and up to date understanding of health care fraud laws and the obligations and expectations that these rules create not only for their organizations, but also increasingly them personally.  Owners and other leaders need to understand the health care fraud rules, the ways that liability can attach not only to their organization but also themselves and their leaders under these rules, the burdens of proof and assumptions that create special challenges in responding to challenges or defending charges and actions and strategies they should take before, during, and after compliance issue or prosecution arises to strengthen their ability to defend or mitigate their and their organization’s liability exposures.  As part of these efforts, owners and leaders not only should ensure that their organization adopt, train staff and others on and meaningfully administer up-to-date compliance programs in a manner that clearly documents the commitment of their organization and its leaders to compliance. Owners, executives and leaders also should become educated about the expectations of DOJ, HHS and other agencies and whistleblowers are likely to expect concerning their role and actions as owners and leaders both in establishing a clear expectation of compliance, as well as adopting, overseeing and enforcing practices and policies to maintain compliance, investigate and redress potential wrongdoing and otherwise maintain the compliance and culture expected and required under federal law.  Owners and leaders should ensure that they and others in their organization are trained to recognize potential compliance issues, understand the steps they and their organization need to take when a potential compliance concern arises, and how to conduct and document investigations and other actions to strengthen their and their organization’s ability to defend against potential charges or other claims..

Owners, executives and other leaders also should anticipate, and prepare in advance for the likelihood that they and their organizations will need to respond investigations, suspected violations, whistleblower claims and other events that could create substantial exposure for their organizations and themselves personally.  Leaders need to understand that the nature and risks associated with these potential health care fraud liabilities may make ill-advised commonly used settlement or other practices for resolving quickly disputes or other concerns.   Owners and leaders bearing these responsibilities should seek specific advice and training about their responsibilities, as well as recommended strategies for investigating and responding to concerns that may carry or give rise to these risks.  Most leaders also will want to ensure that their employment, shareholder and other agreements include sufficient flexibility and protections to protect the executive or other leader for termination, retaliation or other loss or injury for taking appropriate steps to investigate and respond to a compliance concern as well as plan in advance by arranging for their organization to provide indemnification, insurance or other coverage, and/or securing personally coverage to provide coverage needed to fund what often may be substantial legal fees arising out of investigation and defense of investigations, charges, or other actions and the corporate, employment and other fallout that often accompanies such events.


About The Author

A Fellow in the American College of Employee Benefit Counsel, the American Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation, current American Bar Association (ABA) International Section Life Sciences Committee Vice Chair, former scribe for the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits (JCEB) Annual OCR Agency Meeting and JCEB Council Representative, former Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section,  the former Board President and Treasurer of the Richardson Development Center for Children Early Childhood Intervention Agency, and past  Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, and Board Certified in Labor & Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, the author of this update, attorney Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, is AV-Preeminent (the highest) rated attorney repeatedly recognized for her nearly 30 years of experience and knowledge representing and advising healthcare, health plan and other health industry and others on these and other regulatory, workforce, risk management, technology, public policy and operations matters as a Martindale-Hubble as a “LEGAL LEADER™” and “Texas Top Rated Lawyer” in Health Care Law, Labor and Employment Law, and Business & Commercial Law and among the “Best Lawyers In Dallas” by D Magazine.

Ms. Stamer’s health industry experience includes advising hospitals, nursing home, home health, rehabilitation and other health care providers and health industry clients to establish and administer compliance and risk management policies; prevent, conduct and investigate, and respond to peer review and other quality concerns; and to respond to Board of Medicine, Department of Aging & Disability, Drug Enforcement Agency, OCR Privacy and Civil Rights, Department of Labor, IRS, HHS, DOD and other health care industry investigation, enforcement and other compliance, public policy, regulatory, staffing, and other operations and risk management concerns.

Ms. Stamer also is known for her experience in HIPAA and other privacy and data security and breach concerns.  The scribe for ABA JCEB annual agency meeting with OCR for many years, Ms. Stamer has worked extensively with health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses, their business associates, employers and other plan sponsors, banks and other financial institutions, and others on risk management and compliance with HIPAA, FACTA, trade secret and other information privacy and data security rules, including the establishment, documentation, implementation, audit and enforcement of policies, procedures, systems and safeguards, investigating and responding to known or suspected breaches, defending investigations or other actions by plaintiffs, OCR and other federal or state agencies, reporting known or suspected violations, business associate and other contracting, commenting or obtaining other clarification of guidance, training and enforcement, and a host of other related concerns. Her clients include public and private health care providers, health insurers, health plans, technology and other vendors, and others. In addition to representing and advising these organizations, she also has conducted training on Privacy & The Pandemic for the Association of State & Territorial Health Plans, as well as HIPAA, FACTA, PCI, medical confidentiality, insurance confidentiality and other privacy and data security compliance and risk management for Los Angeles County Health Department, ISSA, HIMMS, the ABA, SHRM, schools, medical societies, government and private health care and health plan organizations, their business associates, trade associations and others.

A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry concerns, Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about compliance and internal controls, workforce and medical  staff performance, quality, governance, reimbursement, and other risk management and operational matters. Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, technology, public policy, reimbursement and other operations and risk management concerns. Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.

You can get more information about her health industry experience here or contact Ms. Stamer via telephone at (469) 767-8872 or via e-mail here.

About Solutions Law Press Inc.™

Solutions Law Press, Inc.™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns.

If you found these updates of interest, you may be interested in other recent Solutions Law Press, Inc. updates like the following:

Go here to register to receive other Solutions Law Press, Inc. updates and announcements about other upcoming briefings, training or other programs, products, services, and activities or to learn more about Solutions Law Press, Inc., its publications, programs and training, PROJECT COPE: Coalition on Patient Empowerment community service and education projects, event management and other resources and services.

For important information concerning this communication see here. THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMER IS INCLUDED TO COMPLY WITH AND IN RESPONSE TO U.S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR 230 REGULATIONS. ANY STATEMENTS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE NOT INTENDED OR WRITTEN BY THE WRITER TO BE USED, AND NOTHING CONTAINED HEREIN CAN BE USED BY YOU OR ANY OTHER PERSON, FOR THE PURPOSE OF (1) AVOIDING PENALTIES THAT MAY BE IMPOSED UNDER FEDERAL TAX LAW, OR (2) PROMOTING, MARKETING OR RECOMMENDING TO ANOTHER PARTY ANY TAX-RELATED TRANSACTION OR MATTER ADDRESSED HEREIN.

©2016 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, P.C. Non-exclusive license to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc. All other rights reserved.


10 Year Prison Sentence. $8M Civil Settlement Highlight Risks Of Wrongfully Billing Services Performed By Nonphysicians As Physician Services

July 31, 2015

Austin, Texas physician Dennis B. Barson Jr. and his medical clinic administrator are headed to prison. The 10 year prison sentence imposed against Barson on July 27, 2014, like an $8 million plus health care fraud civil settlement announced by the Justice Department on July 24, 2014 illustrate the significant legal risks that physicians and other health care providers face when physician charges are improperly billed to Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare or other federal or state health care programs for services actually provided by non-physician staff. Physicians and others should heed the lessons from these and other similar federal and state health care fraud enforcement actions when deciding how and when it is appropriate to delegate to and bill federal health care programs for physician services where physicians assistants, nurse practitioners or other nursing staff or other non-physicians perform part or all of the procedures billed.

Dr. Barson Prison Sentence Highlights Criminal Risks

On Monday, July 27, 2015, U.S. District Court Judge Melinda Harmon ordered Barson to serve 120 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release and pay restitution of approximately $1.2 million in punishment for his November 5, 2014 on all 20 counts of conspiracy to defraud Medicare of $2.1 million. See, Austin Doctor Heads to Prison for Health Care Fraud.

With Judge Harmon presiding, a Houston jury found Barson and his medical clinic administrator, Dario Juarez, 55 guilty on the Medicare fraud charges last November. Another co-defendant Edgar Shakbazyan entered a guilty plea to the 21-count original indictment on October 27, 2014. Shakbazyan, of Glendale, California, was sentenced to 97 months in prison, while Juarez, of Beeville, Texas received 130 months. Both will also serve three years of supervised release. The jury convictions of Barson and Juarez followed a trial where Department of Justice prosecutors proved the health care fraud charges based on evidence that Barson, Juarez and Shakbazyan fraudulently billed Medicare for rectal sensation tests and electromyogram (EMG) studies of the anal or urethral sphincter never performed. Shakbazyan was additionally charged and plead guilty to conspiracy to pay kickbacks for payments made to recruiters and beneficiaries. According to the testimony at trial, Barson was the only doctor affiliated with the medical clinic located at 8470 Gulf Freeway in Houston. However, Juarez represented himself to be a doctor and was the one who actually saw patients at the clinic. Barson, Juarez and Shakbazyan caused Medicare to be billed for procedures on 429 patients in just two months. The three men also billed Medicare for seeing more than 100 patients on 13 different days, including a high of 156 patients on July 13, 2009.

Barson’s defense attempted to convince the jury that he was a victim of identity theft and was not the perpetrator of the crimes. The jury conviction shows the jurors not believe his story. The criminal charges are the result of a joint investigation conducted by agents of the FBI, Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General and the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Texas Attorney General’s Office.

Margossian Settlement Shows Even More Common Civil Penalty Risks

Barson’s sentencing is one of a growing series of criminal convictions and sentencing of physicians and other health care providers for health care fraud by participating in arrangements where Medicare, Medicaid or other federal health care programs are billed for services not provided or not provided as required to qualify for reimbursement. On July 24, 2015, for instance, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York and the State of New York announced that that Brooklyn, New York OB/GYN Haroutyoun Margossian, will pay $8, 047, 291.05 as part of a civil settlement with the United States and the State of New York that resolves charges brought under the federal False Claims Act and the New York False Claims Act that Margossian wrongfully billed Medicare and Medicaid for physician services for treatments of women suffering from urinary incontinence that unlicensed and often unsupervised staff, rather than Margossian or another physician, actually administered. Under the terms of the civil settlement agreement, Margossian will pay a total of $8,047,291.06. Contemporaneously with the execution of the civil settlement agreement, the government filed a criminal charge against Margossian for making false statements to Medicare and entered into a deferred prosecution agreement with him. See, Board Certified Obstetrician And Gynecologist Agrees To Civil Fraud Settlement In Conjunction With Deferred Prosecution In Medicare And Medicaid Fraud Investigation.

Health Care Fraud Investigations Raise Other Licensing & Practice Risks

The Barson and Margossian actions are just two, of the already long, and ever-growing criminal convictions, civil sanctions and civil settlements that Federal and state health care fraud fighters already can count as notches of success in their war against health care fraud by physicians and other health care providers. With these successes fueling more investigations, physicians and others considering engaging in billing or other practices in violation of the False Claims Act or other health care fraud laws clearly should be prepared to “do time” for improperly billing physician fees to federal health care programs for services not provided by the billing physician or engage in other inappropriate billing practices. While successfully defending criminal and civil investigations is critical for physicians and others under investigation, targets of audits and investigations also must prepare to deal with a host of other threats to their practices which almost inevitably arise regardless of whether the government investigation leads to a conviction, civil sanctions or a settlement.

As demonstrated by the Margossian settlement, even if physicians, practice management and others swept up into these investigations escape being criminally charged, subjected to civil sanctions or penalties or suspended or excluded from Medicare or other federal health care programs, health care fraud investigations or charges still will carry a heavy cost.  Alongside of the growing success of federal and state prosecutors in criminally prosecuting physicians and others for health care fraud, health care fraud warriors are realizing even greater success in securing civil sanctions and settlements, federal program exclusions and other civil and administrative punishments against physicians and other health care providers that the government accuses of violating the False Claims Act or other federal health care fraud rules.

Of course, whether or not health care fraud civil or criminal investigations, ultimately result in any civil or criminal prosecution, conviction or settlement, physicians and other licensed health care providers under suspicion, audit, investigation, charges or other scrutiny for alleged false claims or other health care fraud inevitably must deal with a broad range of other professional fallout as these activities almost always trigger scrutiny or other actions by their employers and medical practices, peer review notifications and investigations by hospitals, managed care organizations and other health care organizations and plans where they have privileges or contracts, and licensing board or other professional disciplinary investigations if not actual discipline.

Act To Strengthen Your Defenses

In the face of these and other enforcement actions, physicians and others should take steps to minimize the risk of an investigation or audit leading to criminal, civil or other charges as well as take steps to help ensure sufficient resources to defend themselves if the government comes knocking.

Of course, the first step of the process should be to take proper, well documented efforts to properly comply with the rules and be prepared to prove it.  Physicians and the clinics, hospitals and management working with them should use care to critically evaluate when and what can be defensibly billed as physician services to Medicare or another federal healthcare program taking keeping in mind that the billing party, not the government, generally bears the burden of proving that the amount bill qualifies for coverage.  For this reason, physicians and others involved in the process must carefully consider the adequacy of the physician’s involvement in prescribing and delivering services intended to be billed as physician services to Medicare, Medicaid or other federal health care programs to ensure that they deliver and document the services appropriately and that these service billed under the physician’s number as physician services meet all other requirements to qualify for reimbursement as billed. In areas where questions could be raised, physicians and their organizations are strongly urged to take extra care to conduct and retain documentation of their analysis and efforts to verify the compliance of their actions before proceeding, including consulting legal counsel for advice within the scope of attorney-client privilege. Beyond exercising great care to accurately document and properly bill for all services, physicians and others working with them also should familiarize themselves with their obligations and rights under employment agreements, shareholder or partnership agreements, medical staff bylaws, managed care contracts, medical licensing board rules and the Health Care Quality And Improvement Act. In many cases, these arrangements will compel a physician to provide notice of an investigation, audit, allegation or charge, trigger separate investigatory or disciplinary action against the physician, or both. These notice and other obligations may arise and often trigger employment, peer review, licensing board or other investigations before or concurrent with the investigation or prosecution by the government.

Along with the stiff civil sanctions or settlements imposed, physicians and others investigated or charged with health care fraud often incur significant legal and other costs responding to and defending years of government audits and investigations, as well as well as employment, peer review, licensing board and other investigations and disciplinary actions that almost always result from when a physician is accused or investigated for health care fraud even if the government investigation ultimately does not lead to the government filing criminal or civil charges against the physician or other licensed healthcare provider. Since a physician faces a substantial likelihood of being required to respond to and defend him or herself against peer review, licensing board, employment or other nongovernmental investigations or charges as well as the government action, physicians and others also should consider if they can expect to have sufficient funds to pay the legal and other costs of their defense in the event they come under scrutiny taking into account their existing malpractice or other liability insurance coverages, commitments to defend and indemnify under employment, shareholder or partnership, or other agreements, and other resources. Physicians and their organizations concerned about the adequacy of these resources may wish to explore, where available, raising their malpractice policy coverage limits, purchasing other supplemental coverage, and other similar steps to better position themselves to have funds to support and conduct their defense.  As part of this process, physicians generally will want to review the adequacy and limits of the coverages that their practices provides, as well as consider the reliability of that coverage in the event that the physician is terminates or leaves the practice as a result of the investigation or otherwise.

When considering the sufficiency of their existing professional liability insurance coverages, physicians generally will want to consider the adequacy of the coverage if the physician remains with the practice as well as if the physician leaves it.  The 10 year statute of limitations applicable to False Claims Act claims, physicians billings can come back to haunt a physician 10 years after their submission.  With this tremendously long liability period, even in the absence of government investigation, a significant risk exists that a physician may experience a practice relocation or other change that would affect his coverage during this period.  When an investigation happens, the possibility that the physician will relocate his practice skyrockets as physicians often experience suspensions of privileges, involuntary employment terminations and other disruptions to their practice in direct response to the investigation or prosecution. Consequently, physicians should consider purchasing tail coverage, maintaining separate, portable professional liability coverage or both to mitigate these risks.

Beyond the availability of the professional liability coverage, physicians and their practices also should consider the adequacy of the coverage provided by their professional liability or other policies.  When reviewing these coverages, physicians and practices should consider what coverage, if any, the policies provide for defense of the physician in relation to peer review, licensing, or other disciplinary actions, government investigations or prosecutions, or both. If the policy provides no or limited coverage for costs of defending against these events, both the physician and his associated organization or practice may want to explore purchasing additional riders on the existing policy, purchasing separate coverage or both as well as to raise the limits on the coverages provided in light of the predictable high expenses of defending these events.

While physicians definitely need evaluate their coverages in anticipation of a potential investigation or prosecution, practice leaders, hospitals and other organizations that would be swept up into these investigations generally share an interest in ensuring that the physician possesses adequate resources to defend against a government investigation or prosecution, as their organization and its billings are likely to be adversely impacted if the physician is unable to defend the billings.

For More Advice, Assistance Or More Information

If you need assistance reviewing or responding to these or other health care related risk management, compliance, enforcement or management concerns, the author of this update, attorney Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, may be able to help. Ms. Stamer is a highly regarded practicing attorney with extensive health industry legal and policy experience, also recognized as a knowledgeable and highly popular health industry thought and policy leader, who writes and publishes extensively  on health industry concerns. Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section, recognized as a “Top” lawyer in Health Care, Labor and Employment and Employee Benefits Law, Board Certified in Labor & Employment Law, and the former Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, Ms. Stamer has more than 27 years experience advising health industry clients about these and other matters. Her experience includes advising and defending hospitals, nursing home, home health, physicians and other health care professionals, rehabilitation and other health care providers and health industry clients to establish and administer compliance and risk management policies and programs in response under CMS, OCR, HHS, FDA, IRS, DOJ, DEA, NIH, licensing, and other regulations; prevent, conduct and investigate, and respond to Board of Medicine, OIG, DOJ, DEA, DOD, DOL, Department of Health, Department of Aging & Disability, IRS, Department of Insurance, and other federal and state regulators; ERISA and private insurance, prompt pay and other reimbursement and contracting; peer review and other quality concerns; and other health care industry investigation, and enforcement and other compliance, public policy, regulatory, staffing, and other operations and risk management concerns. This experience includes extensive work advising and defending physicians, practices, hospitals and other health care organizations and others about Medicare and other health care billing and reimbursement practices,  as well as advising and defending providers against Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare and other audits, prepayment suspensions, provider exclusions and provider number revocation, and counseling and defending providers, medical staff and peer review committees, hospitals, medical practices and other health care organizations and others in relation to the conduct of audits and investigations, peer review investigations and discipline, employment, licensing board and other associated events.

The scribe for the American Bar Association (ABA) Joint Committee on Employee Benefits annual agency meeting with the Department of Health & Human Services Office of Civil Rights,  Ms. Stamer has worked extensively with health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses, their business associates, employers, banks and other financial institutions, and others on risk management and compliance with HIPAA and other information privacy and data security rules, investigating and responding to known or suspected breaches, defending investigations or other actions by plaintiffs, OCR and other federal or state agencies, reporting known or suspected violations, business associate and other contracting, commenting or obtaining other clarification of guidance, training and enforcement, and a host of other related concerns.  Her clients include public and private health care providers, health insurers, health plans, technology and other vendors, and others.  In addition to representing and advising these organizations, she also has conducted training on Privacy & The Pandemic for the Association of State & Territorial Health Plans,  as well as  HIPAA, FACTA, PCI, medical confidentiality, insurance confidentiality and other privacy and data security compliance and risk management for  Los Angeles County Health Department, ISSA, HIMMS, the ABA, SHRM, schools, medical societies, government and private health care and health plan organizations, their business associates, trade associations and others. Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about compliance and internal controls, workforce and medical staff performance, quality, governance, reimbursement, and other risk management and operational matters. Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, technology, public policy, reimbursement and other operations and risk management concerns. Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.  You can get more information about her health industry experience here. If you need assistance responding to concerns about the matters discussed in this publication or other health care concerns, wish to obtain information about arranging for training or presentations by Ms. Stamer, wish to suggest a topic for a future program or update, or wish to request other information or materials, please contact Ms. Stamer via telephone at (214) 452-8297 or via e-mail here.

About Solutions Law Press

Solutions Law Press™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns. If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns from Ms. Stamer, see here. If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile here. For important information about this communication click here.THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMER IS INCLUDED TO COMPLY WITH AND IN RESPONSE TO U.S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR 230 REGULATIONS.  ANY STATEMENTS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE NOT INTENDED OR WRITTEN BY THE WRITER TO BE USED, AND NOTHING CONTAINED HEREIN CAN BE USED BY YOU OR ANY OTHER PERSON, FOR THE PURPOSE OF (1) AVOIDING PENALTIES THAT MAY BE IMPOSED UNDER FEDERAL TAX LAW, OR (2) PROMOTING, MARKETING OR RECOMMENDING TO ANOTHER PARTY ANY TAX-RELATED TRANSACTION OR MATTER ADDRESSED HEREIN. ©2015 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer.  Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press, Inc.  All other rights reserved.


Former Houston Area DME Owner To Serve 7+ Years, Pay $1.6 M In Restitution For Health Care Fraud

February 9, 2015

On February 2, 2015, U.S. District Judge Michael Schneider sentenced former Ivy Health Care Supply owner Vivian Yusuf to 7 years and 3 months in jail and ordered her to pay $1.6 million in restitution for her September 17, 2014 guilty plea to conspiracy to commit health care fraud.

In March 2011, Yusuf was indicted on charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, and aggravated identity theft. Investigators believe that Yusuf and her co-conspirators billed Medicare for more than $3.4 million for durable medical equipment (DME) that was neither medically necessary nor prescribed by a physician.

The guilty plea stemmed from Yusuf’s January 12, 2012 indictment for conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, and aggravated identity theft for acts committed when she owned and operated Ivy Health Care Supply, a Houston-area durable medical equipment (DME) company based in Stafford, Texas.

According to information presented in court, from June 2007 to May 2009, Yusuf and Aghaegbuna “Ike” Odelugo, James Reese, and others unlawfully submitted false and fraudulent claims to Medicare of more than $3.4 million and defrauded Medicare of more than $1.6 million by marketing of power wheelchairs and accessories, as well as “ortho kits,” which primarily consisted of a bag of orthotic items, including braces, wraps, and supports, and a heat lamp or heat pad.  As part of the scheme, the defendant and her co-conspirators illegally obtained protected health information, including names, dates of birth, and Medicare numbers from elderly individuals.  Yusuf and her co-conspirators supplied approximately 790 beneficiaries located primarily in Texas and Louisiana with kits and power wheelchairs that the beneficiaries did not want and not prescribed or otherwise authorized by a physician.  In some instances, physicians’ signatures were forged and false claims were submitted to Medicare in the names of Medicare beneficiaries who were deceased.

A fugitive for several years before her arrest June 3, 2014 at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, the Department of Health & Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) once listed her on its “Most Wanted List.”

According to OIG, Odelugo and Reese were indicted for their involvement in similar health care fraud schemes.  Odelugo pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, and money laundering and was sentenced to 72 months in federal prison.  The loss to Medicare as a result of Odelugo’s scheme was approximately $9.9 million. Reese pleaded guilty to health care fraud and tax evasion and was sentenced to 180 months in federal prison.  The loss to Medicare as a result of Reese’s scheme was approximately $8.6 million.

In the face of these continuing investigations and prosecutions, health care providers should continue to diligently work to comply with the False Claims Act and other federal and state health care fraud laws by tightening their internal controls and other compliance programs. As a key element of these efforts, health care providers should ensure that their human resources and other management carefully monitor employee, contractor and vendor complaints, concerns and other communications for potential signs of compliance concerns, retaliation or other indicators of the need to intervene to correct potential violations or other risks.

For More Information Or Assistance

If you need assistance reviewing or responding to these or other health care related risk management, compliance, enforcement or management concerns, the author of this update, attorney Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, may be able to help. Vice President of the North Texas Health Care Compliance Professionals Association, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Section and the former Board Compliance Chair of the National Kidney Foundation of North Texas, Ms. Stamer has more than 26 years experience advising health industry clients about these and other matters. Her experience includes advising hospitals, nursing home, home health, rehabilitation and other health care providers and health industry clients to establish and administer compliance and risk management policies; prevent, conduct and investigate, and respond to peer review and other quality concerns; and to respond to Board of Medicine, Department of Aging & Disability, Drug Enforcement Agency, OCR Privacy and Civil Rights, HHS, DOD and other health care industry investigation, enforcement and other compliance, public policy, regulatory, staffing, and other operations and risk management concerns.  The scribe for the American Bar Association (ABA) Joint Committee on Employee Benefits annual agency meeting with the Department of Health & Human Services Office of Civil Rights,  Ms. Stamer has worked extensively with health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses, their business associates, employers, banks and other financial institutions, and others on risk management and compliance with HIPAA and other information privacy and data security rules, investigating and responding to known or suspected breaches, defending investigations or other actions by plaintiffs, OCR and other federal or state agencies, reporting known or suspected violations, business associate and other contracting, commenting or obtaining other clarification of guidance, training and enforcement, and a host of other related concerns.  Her clients include public and private health care providers, health insurers, health plans, technology and other vendors, and others.  In addition to representing and advising these organizations, she also has conducted training on Privacy & The Pandemic for the Association of State & Territorial Health Plans,  as well as  HIPAA, FACTA, PCI, medical confidentiality, insurance confidentiality and other privacy and data security compliance and risk management for  Los Angeles County Health Department, ISSA, HIMMS, the ABA, SHRM, schools, medical societies, government and private health care and health plan organizations, their business associates, trade associations and others.

A popular lecturer and widely published author on health industry concerns, Ms. Stamer continuously advises health industry clients about compliance and internal controls, workforce and medical staff performance, quality, governance, reimbursement, and other risk management and operational matters. Ms. Stamer also publishes and speaks extensively on health and managed care industry regulatory, staffing and human resources, compensation and benefits, technology, public policy, reimbursement and other operations and risk management concerns. Her insights on these and other related matters appear in the Health Care Compliance Association, Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, the Dallas Morning News, Modern Health Care, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, and a many other national and local publications.  You can get more information about her health industry experience here. If you need assistance responding to concerns about the matters discussed in this publication or other health care concerns, wish to obtain information about arranging for training or presentations by Ms. Stamer, wish to suggest a topic for a future program or update, or wish to request other information or materials, please contact Ms. Stamer via telephone at (214) 452-8297 or via e-mail here.

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns from Ms. Stamer, see here.

About Solutions Law Press

Solutions Law Press™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press resources including:


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